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Wed. Apr 17th, 2024

An unprecedented campaign against anti-farming policies has been launched by new NFF President David Jochinke in his first day in the role.

Victorian grain and livestock producer David Jochinke has been elected President of the National Farmers’ Federation, succeeding Fiona Simson who steps down after seven years in the role. Hailing from Murra Warra in western Victoria, Mr Jochinke has served as Vice President of the NFF since 2017, and previously served as President of the Victorian Farmers’ Federation from 2016 – 2020. John Hassall, a farmer from East Pingelly in Western Australia also joins the NFF’s leadership team in the position of Vice President.

The national Keep Farmers Farming campaign will focus on key issues such as water buybacks in the Murray Darling Basin; worker shortages on farms and in the food supply chain; red and green tape restrictions on agriculture, and competition policy.

Speaking in Canberra at the National Farmers’ Federation National Conference, Mr Jochinke called on parliamentarians to stand up against policies which threaten to slash billions from farm production.

“Farmers have always put food on the table for Australians and clothes on our backs, but decisions are being made in Canberra that will make it harder to do.

“They’re taking away the water, land and workers needed to grow food. That means fewer farmers doing what they do and when farmers grow less, everyone pays more,” he said.

NSW Farmers has thrown its support behind the unprecedented national campaign against anti-farming policies.

Liverpool Plains farmer and NSW Farmers President Xavier Martin said the Australian agriculture industry was united in its stand to call on Federal parliamentarians to stand up against policies which threaten to slash billions from farm production.

“Farmers have always put food on the table for Australians and clothes on our backs, but decisions are being made in Canberra that will make it harder to do,” Mr Martin said.

“They’re taking away the water, land and workers needed to grow food. That means fewer farmers doing what they do and when farmers grow less, everyone pays more.”

The campaign comes after a national survey of more than 1600 farmers revealed falling confidence in the farming sector and reservations about the approach of the Albanese Government. The survey found the majority of farmers (54.3 per cent) thought the Federal Government’s policies were harming the industry, and only 31.2 per cent thought they were doing a good job for farmers.

Mr Martin urged farmers and consumers to rally behind the campaign and show their support by signing an open letter to the Prime Minister, contacting their local MP, or making a donation to the campaign.

“In the coming months, decisions by the Federal Government threaten to shave billions off farm production. We need support to ensure we have the right policies that help keep farmers farming,” he said.

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